the ’72 hour cabin’, launched by ‘visit sweden’ in collaboration with west sweden tourist board, aims to discover the effects of living ‘close to nature’ for three days. five people with busy schedules and stressful jobs were chosen for the experience which will take place on an island in sweden.

72 hour cabin
each participant will be accommodated with a private cabin 
image by maja flink

 

 

the goal of the project is to study the well-being of the participants as they engage in the swedish lifestyle of close ‘proximity to nature’. the participants stay in custom-built cabins made of glass. the cabins are located on henriksholm island, two hours north of gothenburg, which is 60% forest and 40% grazing for highland cattle. 

72 hour cabin
the inclusion of glass in the design ensures close contact with nature
image by maja flink

 

 

jeanna berger, an architecture student at chalmers tekniska högskola in gothenburg, designed the cabins. jeanna’s brother-in-law, jonas fred hell, and his colleague robert fridh from fridh & hells bygg AB construction company in bengtsfors, realised her vision and built the cabins. two leading researchers, walter osika and cecilia stenfors, from the karolinska institute in stockholm, will manage the research case study and present their findings in october.

72 hour cabin
the cabins were custom-built by architecture student jeanna berger

72 hour cabin


the cabins are located on henriksholm island, two hours north of gothenburg
image by maja flink

72 hour cabin
the raw design creates a rudimentary shelter from which to experience the natural world 

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